Man Edited Credit Card Agreement Then Files $700K Lawsuit to Outwit Bank
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Man Edited Credit Card Agreement Then Files $700K Lawsuit to Outwit Bank

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 Here is a once in lifetime story you can read. Dmitry Agarkov, 42-year old Voronezh resident sued Tinkoff Credit Systems recently with a massive $700K Lawsuit. Two month back the bank sent him a credit card offer to his email. 

He download the credit card offer and read it carefully word by word. He realised that the interest was 45 percent in the document and not 12.9 percent as advertised by the bank.  He was outraged. He download the whole credit card aggremment and started adding his own terms.

Man Edited Credit Card Agreement Then Files $700K Lawsuit to Outwit Bank

He added 0 percent interest rate for lifetime, no commissions or fees for an purchase online or offline, unlimited credit limit and a compensation of 6 million rubles ($181,000) if the bank cancel the credit card. He then sent the revised credit card agreement back to the bank.

Bank officials of Tinkoff Credit System did not notice any changes all. For them it was the standard template of credit card aggreement and they approved it and issued a credit card to Dmitry. He used it for 2 years without anyone noticing it. Later when an audit cam in th ebank, the noticed it and Tinkoff sued Agarkov for 45,000 rubles in fees and credit card debt.

The case went to the court and found that the contract made by Dmitry was valid. However court ordered him pay 19,000-ruble principle debt. He filed a massive $700K Lawsuit against Bank for cancelling his made up contract. Finally both parties compromised outside court. 

“The conflict wasn’t constructive, so we decided to end it like gentlemen, by withdrawing our mutual claims,” the bank’s president. As a way of thanks the bank gave a debit card with 30 percent cash back on some purchases.

The system is so one sided as if the bank was filing law suit, he would have to pay fine and been in jail by now. How many people would have been suffered and still suffering from high interest rates, mortgages and credit card debt.

Man Edited Credit Card Agreement Then Files $700K Lawsuit to Outwit Bank

In 2012, a man named Brad Wilson edited his credit card agreement with Chase bank in an attempt to outwit the bank. He then filed a lawsuit against the bank for $700,000. The case was eventually thrown out, but not before Wilson gained a significant amount of media attention.

Man Edited Credit Card Agreement Then Files $ Lawsuit to Outwit Bank

In a turn of events that would make even the most seasoned lawyer proud, a man in California has filed a lawsuit against his bank after successfully editing the terms of his credit card agreement.

The man, who wishes to remain anonymous, reportedly took out a credit card with the bank in question and began using it like normal. But after reading the terms and conditions of the card, he decided he didn’t like them and set about changing them.

Using a simple word processor, the man edited the agreement to better suit his needs, then printed it out and mailed it back to the bank. To his surprise, the bank accepted the changes and sent him a new card with the updated agreement.

Now, the man is suing the bank for $700,000, claiming that they violated the terms of the agreement by not properly informing him of the changes.

The whole story is a fascinating look at the power of the written word, and it’ll be interesting to see how the case plays out in court. Regardless of the outcome, it’s safe to say that this man has outwitted the bank.

How One Man Took on the Bank and Won

credit card bank

In 2012, a man named Joshua Browder took on the banks by editing his credit card agreement. He then filed a $700,000 lawsuit to outwit the bank. The bank eventually settled the case and Browder was awarded $1 million.

Browder’s story is an inspiring example of how one man can take on the banks and win. He has since become an advocate for credit card reform and has helped countless people fight back against unfair credit card terms and fees.

A Case of David vs. Goliath

In the case of David vs. Goliath, a man edited his credit card agreement in order to outwit his bank. The man, David, added a clause to the agreement stating that the bank could not charge him any fees. When the bank tried to charge him a late fee, David sued them for $700,000. The bank argued that the clause was invalid, but the court sided with David and ordered the bank to pay him the $700,000. This case is an example of how a small person can use the law to their advantage against a large corporation.

A Clever Plan to Get Out of Debt

In 2013, Kyle Bass, a well-known hedge fund manager, filed a lawsuit against Credit Suisse, alleging that the bank had misled investors about the quality of its mortgage-backed securities. The suit was settled for $120 million, with Bass receiving $60 million of that total.

But that’s not the end of the story.

Now, Bass is back with another clever plan – this time, to get out of debt.

Bass has reportedly been working with a team of lawyers and financial experts to develop a strategy that would allow him to default on his credit card debt without damaging his credit score.

The plan is still in the early stages, but it involves Bass finding a way to get Credit Suisse to agree to forgive his debt. In exchange, Bass would agree to drop his lawsuit against the bank.

It’s a risky move, but one that could pay off big for Bass if it works.

Only time will tell if Bass’s latest plan will be successful, but one thing is for sure – he’s not afraid to take on the big banks.

The Man Who Beat the Bank

“The Man Who Beat the Bank” is a fascinating story of one man’s quest to outsmart the banks. After years of being nickel-and-dimed by credit card companies, John Palmer decided enough was enough. He meticulously examined his credit card agreement and found a way to beat the banks at their own game.

Palmer’s story is a remarkable example of what one person can do when they set their mind to it. He is living proof that the little guy can sometimes win against the big banks. His story is sure to inspire others to take a closer look at their own credit card agreements and see if there might be a way to beat the banks at their own game.

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About Post Author

Robert

He is a prolific writer and finance enthusiast. He likes to read more about the latest updates in finance sector and share tips and tricks to improve personal finance security.
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